Made the right decision? Quick visual confidence check

Made the right decision? Quick visual confidence check

So you’ve made a decision as a group … everyone has contributed their opinions, you’ve assessed the pros and cons of each proposal, you’ve even held a vote.

But how confident do you feel that the right decision has been made?

Did some people agree to the decision just to get out of the meeting early?

Got that niggling feeling that maybe not everyone is exactly on board?

Time to run a quick confidence check (with thanks to David Sibbet):

  • Draw a line from 0 to 10.
  • Ask each person to rate how confident they are that the decision made was a good one, with 10 being completely confident and 0 as having no confidence.
  • Everyone calls out their number and make x marks at the appropriate place.
  • The result will be a graphic picture of confidence.
  • Ask the people who provided the lower ratings to talk about what would need to happen to make them fully confident.

Try this the next time you need to make a decision and as always let me know how you get on.

How to solve problems using visual thinking

How to solve problems using visual thinking

Ever feel stuck?

Simple drawings are a powerful tool to shift us from a feeling of inertia to one of clarity and control.

If you’re grappling with a problem and haven’t been able to settle on a solution try drawing it out.

By simply drawing out the who, what, when and where of your problem you will soon start to see aspects you hadn’t considered till now. This act of putting pen to paper, of thinking visually allows for new ideas to form and solutions to emerge.

Want to take it further? Here’s your step by step guide (with thanks to David Sibbet):

1.      Focus the issue – who, what, when, where
2.      Start brainstorming solutions – one idea per post-it
3.      Group the notes and label the headings
4.      Discuss each proposal
5.      Vote on the most promising
6.      Discuss top three – pros/cons of each option.
7.      Make decision

This becomes particularly powerful when we start working as a group to solve problems and several ideas emerge.

Solving problems as a group and not sure everyone has bought into the decision? Tune in next week for a quick technique that tests this and ensures everyone is on the same page.

To tap into your creative problem solving skills don’t forget to book onto next week’s Secrets of Simple Graphics course on April 26th 2019 Book now >>

More flipchart borders: get those markers out!

More flipchart borders: get those markers out!

I recently published a blog with border ideas for flipcharts.

It’s been my second most popular blog this year (following ‘Free visual coaching template’) so I thought I’d share a few more ideas here.

Thanks to those of you who get in touch. I always love hearing about how people are getting on using the tips and ideas I share.

So here we go, six more border ideas for you.

Border ideas for flipcharts

Which ones do you like best? Which ones will work best in your training room? And if you’ve got some of your own that you’d like to see featured in a future email do let me know.

Graphic templates for meetings

Ever been to a meeting where you didn’t quite know what was going on?

Of if you did, you weren’t quite sure what actions were agreed?

Have you ever turned up to a large meeting not knowing exactly who was in the room?

Or perhaps you’ve had excellent, productive meetings only to forget what was said the next day.

Using a graphic template for your meeting is a great way to ensure clarity, comprehension and direction. It also helps to save time and increase efficiency, reducing the need for repetition.

After all meetings are expensive – it’s so important to make the most of the time spent in the room (or indeed virtually).

All you need to do is think of the key elements of any meeting.

In his excellent book, Visual Meetings, David Sibbet claims that the two things foremost in peoples’ minds when they go into a meeting is, ‘Who’s who in the room?’ and ‘What’s the purpose of this meeting?’, so that’s a good place to start.

Other elements may include:
– Agenda items
– Ground Rules
– Outcomes
– Agreed actions
etc.

Decide on an overall theme or metaphor and add simple graphics to make your template come to life.

Above is a digital mock up of a graphic template I used recently, based on ideas from The Grove Consultants.

What kind of graphic template would work for your meetings?

P.S. Places are already going fast for the next Secrets of Simple Graphics course on April 26th 2019. Secure your place now.