Meeting our needs

Meeting our needs

Ever since being trained in the use of Person Centred Planning MAP and PATH tools back in 2002, I’ve always been a fan of using visuals for planning. I use visual planning in my own business, as well as with individuals and teams.

More recently I’ve been considering all the different ways we can use visuals for personal development.

I’m developing a series of visual templates and wanted to share this one with you.

You may be familiar with Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. The author and coach Tony Robbins has developed Maslow’s theory to define what he calls the ‘6 Human Needs’. To help us to consider these needs and how we are meeting them – and in fact to take a step back and address more fundamental needs first – I have created this visual template.

Here’s how it works. Print out the template so you can fill it out. Feel free to add more doodles and drawings to clarify your thoughts as you work through it.

Meeting our needs visual template

Instructions for using the template:

1. First consider whether the basic needs of sleep, water, exercise and sunlight are being met (Tick the box underneath each need for all that apply). It is much easier to tackle change, make plans and move forward in life when these fundamental needs are being met.  If there is any need here that is not being met put energy into resolving this before moving on to the next stage.

2. Now from 1-10 score the level at which the following needs are being met:

  • Certainty/Comfort: The need for a level of predictability and security in life. At its basic level this is about knowing we have a roof over our heads, food on the table and people we can rely on, and that none of these elements are under threat.
  • Variety/Uncertainty: Variety is the spice of life (or is it?!) This is a need for change, spontaneity, risk and adventure, all of which are important in terms of adding interest and excitement in our lives.
  • SignificanceThis is the need to have meaning in our lives. We all want to feel important and to know that we matter to others and that we are are worthy of respect.
  • Connection/Love: The need to feel connected to and loved by other people, to feel part of a community and have close relationships.
  • Growth: This is the desire to grow, to develop, to learn new things, to stretch ourselves, to improve and to accomplish goals.
  • Contribution: This is the need to add value to the lives of others, to contribute to something bigger than ourselves, to make a difference.

Once you have considered the extent to which your needs have been met add each ‘score’ to the relevant section in the template. You may wish to draw a line between each score to highlight how balanced (or unbalanced) your needs currently are. For example, if you scored 6 in each area when you draw the lines between each one the result will be a very balanced wheel, however, if you scored 2 in some areas and 8 in others, for example, your resulting wheel may be a little wobbly.

3. Select three needs you wish to focus on (these don’t necessarily need to be the lowest scoring) and ask yourself what small steps you can take in the next week to move forward in each of these areas.

Reviewing our basic needs on a regular basis not only supports us in creating foundations from which we can make plans, it can also help to inform those plans. The next time you are feeling stuck or having difficulty moving forward consider printing off this template and taking time to reflect on your needs.

I hope you enjoy this visual coaching template (note: this template is for personal use only). I’d love to get your feedback! Hit reply to this email to let me know in the comments what you think.

 

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Made the right decision? Quick visual confidence check

Made the right decision? Quick visual confidence check

So you’ve made a decision as a group … everyone has contributed their opinions, you’ve assessed the pros and cons of each proposal, you’ve even held a vote.

But how confident do you feel that the right decision has been made?

Did some people agree to the decision just to get out of the meeting early?

Got that niggling feeling that maybe not everyone is exactly on board?

Time to run a quick confidence check (with thanks to David Sibbet):

  • Draw a line from 0 to 10.
  • Ask each person to rate how confident they are that the decision made was a good one, with 10 being completely confident and 0 as having no confidence.
  • Everyone calls out their number and make x marks at the appropriate place.
  • The result will be a graphic picture of confidence.
  • Ask the people who provided the lower ratings to talk about what would need to happen to make them fully confident.

Try this the next time you need to make a decision and as always let me know how you get on.

Five Fun Lettering Ideas

Five Fun Lettering Ideas

There are moments when you’d really like to add a simple graphic to a word or phrase but you just can’t think of one.

In these instances you can play around with our lettering to make it stand out. Do something to the letters that expresses meaning or emotion.

Here are five for you to try out. What more can you think of?

Remember to always check for legibility. Is it easy to read? Can it be seen at the back of the room?

Have fun!

How to solve problems using visual thinking

How to solve problems using visual thinking

Ever feel stuck?

Simple drawings are a powerful tool to shift us from a feeling of inertia to one of clarity and control.

If you’re grappling with a problem and haven’t been able to settle on a solution try drawing it out.

By simply drawing out the who, what, when and where of your problem you will soon start to see aspects you hadn’t considered till now. This act of putting pen to paper, of thinking visually allows for new ideas to form and solutions to emerge.

Want to take it further? Here’s your step by step guide (with thanks to David Sibbet):

1.      Focus the issue – who, what, when, where
2.      Start brainstorming solutions – one idea per post-it
3.      Group the notes and label the headings
4.      Discuss each proposal
5.      Vote on the most promising
6.      Discuss top three – pros/cons of each option.
7.      Make decision

This becomes particularly powerful when we start working as a group to solve problems and several ideas emerge.

Solving problems as a group and not sure everyone has bought into the decision? Tune in next week for a quick technique that tests this and ensures everyone is on the same page.

To tap into your creative problem solving skills don’t forget to book onto next week’s Secrets of Simple Graphics course on April 26th 2019 Book now >>

Guest article: United Colours Of Leith

Guest article: United Colours Of Leith

This month’s guest article is from Gerry Farrell of Gerry Farrell Ink who describes his work on using visuals for social change.

‘The day after the Brexit vote, racist, neo-Nazi stickers appeared in Leith, probably the most multi-ethnic and tolerant comunity in Scotland.
We (Leithers Don’t Litter) responded immediately to show that Leithers wouldn’t stand for this.
I wrote an article about it in The Evening News. The next morning about 4am I was threatened by people who claimed to be neo-Nazis and said they knew where I lived.
We called the police who came and installed a direct panic button alarm in our house.
Then we organised a 400-strong anti-Nazi, anti-racist demonstration through Leith, culminating in a rally on Leith Links.
But we didn’t stop there, we also created a very visual toolkit that could be downloaded by any community that suddenly found a racial element causing trouble or making threats in their neighbourhood.
Here is a link to the toolkit:

United Colours Campaign

We pinched Benetton’s line and twisted it so it could be adapted for any part of Britain.

We are proud to show our true colours. The United Colours of Leith.’

Gerry Farrell Ink is creative and coaching consultancy for brands and organisations that want to communicate a social purpose. For more information see http://www.gerryfarrellink.com/

I hope you enjoyed this insightful piece from Gerry.

As I’m sure you’re aware by now visuals are an incredibly powerful tool for creating change.